Inspired by light, passion and mystery. All images are copy-writed to myself, unless stated otherwise. No images may be used without consent.

 

Hi and thank you for clicking onto my photography blog. With this blog I aim to help with any photography research you may need and hopefully give you inspiration for your own photographic practise. I will always make sure my content is accurate and helpful so that you will enjoy reading the posts. There are also a few sections of my University work on here that I think may help any photography students that stumble across my blog 🙂

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This quote is for those times where I dont know what to do, where I sit and do nothing towards my work. I must always be thinking about what to do next, have a plan, and shoot photographs. Even if I dont know how the photographs will fit into my work I should take pictures, as a photographer I should do this often.

Louis-Jacques-Mandé Daguerre was born on the 18th of November 1787 and died on the 19th of July 1851.

In 1829, Daguerre partnered with NicĂ©phore NiĂ©pce, an inventor who had produced the world’s first heliograph in 1822 and the first permanent camera photograph four years later. NiĂ©pce died in 1833, but Daguerre continued experimenting and evolved the process which would subsequently be known as the Daguerreotype.

Earliest surviving heliographic engraving. The plate was exposed under an ordinary engraving and copied it by photographic means. This was a step towards the first permanent photograph from nature, taken with a camera obscura, in 1826.

After efforts to interest private investors proved fruitless, Daguerre went public with his invention in 1839. At a meeting of the French Academy of Sciences on 7 January of that year, the invention was announced and described in general terms, but all specific details were withheld. Members of the Academy and other select individuals were allowed to examine specimens at Daguerre’s studio. The images were enthusiastically praised as nearly miraculous and news of the Daguerreotype quickly spread. Arrangements were made for Daguerre’s rights to be acquired by the French Government in exchange for lifetime pensions for himself and NiĂ©pce’s son Isidore; then, on 19 August 1839, the French Government presented the invention as a gift from France “free to the world” and complete working instructions were published.

In 1826, prior to his association with Daguerre, Niépce used a coating of bitumen to make the first permanent camera photograph. The bitumen was hardened where it was exposed to light and the unhardened portion was then removed with a solvent. A camera exposure lasting for hours or days was required. Niépce and Daguerre later refined this process, but unacceptably long exposures were still needed.

After the death of NiĂ©pce in 1833, Daguerre concentrated his attention on the light-sensitive properties of silver salts, which had previously been demonstrated by Johann Heinrich Schultz and others. For the process which was eventually named the Daguerreotype, he exposed a thin silver-plated copper sheet to the vapor given off by iodine crystals, producing a coating of light-sensitive silver iodide on the surface. The plate was then exposed in the camera. Initially, this process, too, required a very long exposure to produce a distinct image, but Daguerre made the crucial discovery that an invisibly faint “latent” image created by a much shorter exposure could be chemically “developed” into a visible image. The latent image on a Daguerreotype plate was developed by subjecting it to the vapor given off by mercury heated to 75° Celsius. The resulting visible image was then “fixed” (made insensitive to further exposure to light) by removing the unaffected silver iodide with concentrated and heated salt water. Later, a solution of the more effective “hypo” (hyposulphite of soda, now known as sodium thiosulfate) was used instead.

The resultant plate produced an exact reproduction of the scene. The image was laterally reversed — as images in mirrors are — unless a mirror or inverting prism was used during exposure to flip the image. To be seen optimally, the image had to be lit at a certain angle and viewed so that the smooth parts of its mirror-like surface, which represented the darkest parts of the image, reflected something dark or dimly lit. The surface was subject to tarnishing by prolonged exposure to the air and was so soft that it could be marred by the slightest friction, so a Daguerreotype was almost always sealed under glass before being framed (as was commonly done in France) or mounted in a small folding case (as was normal in the UK and US).

The Daguerreotype was the Polaroid film of its day: it produced a unique image which could only be duplicated by using a camera to photograph the original. Despite this drawback, millions of Daguerreotypes were produced. The paper-based calotype process, introduced by Henry Fox Talbot in 1841, allowed the production of an unlimited number of copies by simple contact printing, but it had its own shortcomings—the grain of the paper was obtrusively visible in the image and the extremely fine detail of which the Daguerreotype was capable was not possible. The introduction of the wet collodion process in the early 1850s provided the basis for a negative-positive print-making process not subject to these limitations, although it, like the Daguerreotype, was initially used to produce one-of-a-kind images—ambrotypes on glass and tintypes on black-lacquered iron sheets—rather than prints on paper. These new types of images were much less expensive than Daguerreotypes and they were easier to view. By 1860 few photographers were still using Daguerre’s process.

The same small ornate cases commonly used to house Daguerreotypes were also used for images produced by the later and very different ambrotype and tintype processes, and the images originally in them were sometimes later discarded so that they could be used to display photographic paper prints. It is now a very common error for any image in such a case to be described as “a Daguerreotype”. A true Daguerreotype is always an image on a highly polished silver surface, usually under protective glass. If it is viewed while a brightly lit sheet of white paper is held so as to be seen reflected in its mirror-like metal surface, the Daguerreotype image will appear as a relatively faint negative—its dark and light areas reversed—instead of a normal positive. Other types of photographic images are almost never on polished metal and do not exhibit this peculiar characteristic of appearing positive or negative depending on the lighting and reflections.

Daguerreotype of Louis Daguerre in 1844 by Jean-Baptiste Sabatier-Blot.

Full article and extra information can be found here.

I was given the task of creating a scale model of the Frameless Gallery for the London exhibition. We needed it to put our scale models into, so we could work out where each person could place their images in the gallery. I had a 1:100 scale image of the gallery and I had to turn this into a 1:20 scale for the model. I used foam board because I knew I could cut it with a craft knife and it was study enough to make a model out of. I used cello-tape to strengthen the edges because I knew PVA glue wouldn’t be enough. Overall I am very happy with the scale model, it serves its purpose. I proved I could work to a time scale because the group needed the model made for a specific time, and that once I take on a task I will complete it. Here are some photographs of my completed model, both the ground floor and basement of the gallery.

Would you like to see my work in a gallery setting?  My work will be exhibited in the Lanchester gallery in Coventry University and in the Frameless Gallery in London. The date and details for each are as follows.

Coventry Degree Show  1st of June until the 10th of June The Gallery is open from 10am until 6pm

Lanchester Gallery CV1 5FJ

Private View by invite only 1st of June 2012

Frameless Gallery Exhibition 18th of June until the 24th of June

Frameless Gallery 20 Clerkenwell Green EC1R 0DP London

Private View 18th of June 6pm-late

The Exhibition features the work of:

Dorrell Merritt
Julia Frost
Pete Lord
Ellie Chimonas
Bijash Chauhan
Kayleigh Dolphin
Emma Bashforth
Chloe Short
Stacie Walker

Check out our website!

Updated Cv 2

Chloe Short’s CV

Chloe Short |(Mobile No) | (Email Address) | (Address) | http://www.chloe328.wordpress.com | http://cshortportfolio.wordpress.com

Profile:

I am a highly organised worker, who can keep to deadlines effectively. I am able to get my ideas across when working in large groups, and I can also work alone and motivate myself to get jobs finished for their deadline. I always strive to work the hardest I can, making the best of any project given to me.

Qualification description:

Coventry University, 28/9/2009-8/7/2012 Photography BA (Hons)

John Leggott College, 1/9/2007-1/7/2009

Photography A level – B

History A Level – C

Art A Level – D

Foxhills Technology College Gcse’s

History – A*

English Double Award – A, A

Science Double Award – A, A

Maths – A

Art – B

French – B

Graphics – C

Work history: 

Professional Experience Assisting Paul Smith

I volunteered to assist my lecturer Paul Smith on a shoot at the Derby Rolls Royce staff training centre/engine museum with another student. Paul was going to photograph composite images of aeroplane engines using several different pictures with varying exposures in HD to create one image. He did this by taking an underexposed image an overexposed image and an image that was perfectly exposed, so he could later put them together on Phocus (the image editing software by Hassleblad). I gained experience by helping set up the portable studio lights wherever Paul wanted them and moving all the equipment from one engine to another. I also set up reflectors and the tripod for his camera. We also had to solve problems together; one example of this is we had to decide how to cover the writing behind one of the engines we decided to use tape and reflectors.

Professional Experience for Second Year of Photography Degree

I held an exhibition with two other photography students for my professional experience. We had to find a gallery to exhibit in, get our photographs printed and framed ourselves and advertise our exhibition ourselves. I feel I communicated well in the group, we made decisions together, but I still voiced my opinions when necessary. I had good time management, I always showed up to meetings on time, and got all my photographs hung ready for the opening. I gained new people skills from talking to the people who came to view my work and I am now more confident in myself to talk to people.

Work Experience for Year 10 at Foxhills Technology College at Oxfam for1 week.

For my work experience I decided to go and help out at my local Oxfam charity shop. I helped to sort through the clothes for the shop. Linda the manager was really happy about the help. I used a tag gun to put labels on the clothes and price them ready for the shop floor. I also sorted out the clothes and bric-a-brac on the shop floor so they would look neat for the customers to see. I really enjoyed this job, my work colleagues were all friendly and we could chat while we worked. I used my time management skills to make sure I got everything done in time each day. I used my communication skills to help customers find items they were looking for. I worked the hardest I could to help the shop get through the large amount of donations; I helped to clear the entire top room. At the end of my work experience week Linda rang me to say I worked extremely well and if I ever wanted to volunteer there she would have me back anytime.

Interest and hobbies: 
I have always been interested in photography, since I first picked up a disposable camera.  I am passionate about the medium and always look for new ways to improve my knowledge of techniques and past photographers. I have used film cameras, developing the film myself, and I have used digital cameras. I have also used a medium format camera so am familiar with many types of photography. I love working in the darkroom developing prints and I enjoy working on Photoshop with digital pictures, after joining in with Photoshop classes I am now confident at using the software. I also keep and maintain my own wordpress blog, and manage my time to make sure I consistently keep high quality content on my site.

I have become more confident at speaking in front of people, doing speaking presentations and narrated videos, so I feel I could take on any challenge that I faced.

I am also very interested in cooking especially baking, I enjoy creating something new from a few ingredients and I like coming up with my own recipes. One of my passions is baking cakes, I like trying out new ideas and decorating them using many techniques that I enjoy learning. I like finding out new ways to make things and learning new skills.

 

Awards and membership of professional bodies: 
100% attendance Foxhills Technology College 2002, 2004 and 2005

 

References:

Available on request

(Paul M Smith aa5172@coventry.ac.uk
Coventry University Photography Module Leader)

(Matt Johnston aa9665@coventry.ac.uk

Coventry University Technology and student support)

My email, phone number and address are not on this version because I don’t want them posted on the internet, but they will be on the final version when I go to apply for jobs.


Updated CV

Chloe Short CV

Profile:

I am a highly organised worker, who can keep to deadlines effectively. I am able to get my ideas across when working in large groups, and I can also work alone and motivate myself to get jobs finished for their deadline. I always strive to work the hardest I can, making the best of any project given to me.

Qualification description:

John Leggott College, 1/9/2007-1/7/2009 Photography A level B

John Leggott College, 1/9/2007-1/7/2009 History A Level C

John Leggott College, 1/9/2007-1/7/2009 Art A Level D

Coventry University, 28/9/2009-8/7/2012 Photography Grade: Pending

Work history:

Work Experience for Year 10 at Foxhills Technology College

Oxfam 1 week

For my work experience I decided to go and help out at my local Oxfam charity shop. I had to go have an interview first with the manager Linda, was talked about the job and what skills I would need to accomplish it. I couldn’t work on the till because that needed a weeks training, but I could help upstairs sorting out all the donations. I did that for a week, Linda was really happy about the help. I used a tag gun to put labels on the clothes and price them ready for the shop floor. I also sorted out the clothes and bric-a-brac on the shop floor so they would look neat for the customers to see. I really enjoyed this job, my work colleagues were all friendly and we could chat while we worked. I used my time management skills to make sure I got everything done in time each day. I used my communication skills to help customers find items they were looking for. I worked the hardest I could to help the shop get through the large amount of donations, I helped to clear the entire top room. At the end of my work experience week Linda rang me to say I worked extremely well and if I ever wanted to volunteer there she would have me back anytime.

Professional Experience for Second Year of Photography Degree

I held an exhibition with two other photography students for my professional experience. We had to find a gallery to exhibit in, get our photographs printed and framed ourselves and advertise our exhibition ourselves. I feel I communicated well in the group, we made decisions together, but I still voiced my opinions when necessary. I had good time management, I always showed up to meetings on time, and got all my photographs hung ready for the opening. I gained new people skills from talking to the people who came to view my work and I am now more confident in myself to talk to people.

Professional Experience Assisting Paul Smith

Myself and another photography student Pete volunteered to assist our lecturer Paul Smith on a shoot at the Derby Rolls Royce staff training centre/engine museum. We had to be ready to help pack his equipment into the mini bus at 8.45 to set off at 9. Paul was going to photograph composite images of aeroplane engines using several different pictures with varying exposures in HD to create one image. He did this by taking an underexposed image an overexposed image and an image that was perfectly exposed, so he could later put them together on Phocus (the image editing software by Hassleblad). I gained experience by helping set up the portable studio lights wherever Paul wanted them and moving all the equipment from one engine to another. I also set up reflectors and the tripod for his camera. Me and Pete also had to solve problems together, one example is that we had to decide how to cover the writing behind one of the engines, we used tape and reflectors.

Interest and hobbies: 
I have always been interested in photography, since I first picked up a disposable camera. So I am passionate about the medium and always look for new ways to improve my knowledge of techniques and past photographers. I have used film cameras, developing the film myself, and I have used digital cameras. I have also used a medium format camera so am familiar with many types of photography. I love working in the darkroom developing prints and I enjoy working on Photoshop with digital pictures.

I am also very interested in cooking especially baking, I enjoy creating something new from a few ingredients and I like coming up with my own recipes. One of my passions is baking cakes, I like trying out new ideas and decorating them using many techniques that I enjoy learning. I like finding out new ways to make things and learning new skills.

Awards and membership of professional bodies: 
100% attendance Foxhills Technology College 2002, 2004 and 2005

References:

Paul M Smith

aa5172@coventry.ac.uk
Coventry University Photography Module Leader

Contact details:

Name: Chloe Short

Blog: Chloe328.wordpress.com

I photographed my installation in the photography studio so that I can show you how it looks all set up. I made the lighting slightly darker than usual so the photographs feel intimate, like you were looking at them in the gallery. I wanted it to look like the photographs were flowing out of the suitcase all from one piece of ribbon, that’s why I tied all the pieces of ribbon together with the longest piece of ribbon.

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