Inspired by light, passion and mystery. All images are copy-writed to myself, unless stated otherwise. No images may be used without consent.

Image from here.

To a casual observer he might have seemed a typical commercial photographer of the day. He was not progressive, but worked patiently with techniques that were obsolescent (when something is no longer wanted) when he adopted them, and very nearly anachronistic (a practise that belongs to an earlier time) by the time of his death. He was little given to experiment in the conventional sense, and less to theorizing. He founded no movement and attracted no circle. He did however make photographs which for purity and intensity of vision have not been bettered.

Atget’s work is unique on two levels. He was the maker of a great visual catalogue of the fruits of French culture, as it survived in and near Paris in the first quarter of this century. He was in addition a photographer of such authority and originality that his work remains a bench mark against which much of the most sophisticated contemporary photography measures itself. Other photographers had been concerned with describing specific facts (documentation), or with exploiting their individual sensibilities (self-expression). Atget encompassed and transcended both approaches when he set himself the task of understanding and interpreting in visual terms a complex, ancient, and living tradition.

The pictures that he made in the service of this concept are seductively and deceptively simple, wholly poised, reticent, dense with experience, mysterious, and true.

Extract from here.

Image from here.

Image from here.

Image from here.

I remembered Eugene Atget’s work from presentations we did in the first year, and I remembered that I really liked the aesthetic they had. I want to achieve a sort of vintage/old feel to my photographs, using darkroom techniques and Photoshop. I want this vintage feel to add to the mystery about my photographs so they hopefully will cause the viewer to think more about the image and imagine their own narrative.

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